Politicians push for faster cull of online terrorist content

British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a meeting on action to end modern slavery and human trafficking on the sidelines of the 72n

British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a meeting on action to end modern slavery and human trafficking on the sidelines of the 72n

INTERNET giants must remove all extremist content within two hours of it being posted or face crippling fines, Theresa May will demand. Groups like Daesh, another way of referring to the Islamic State, are accused by politicians of using the internet to radicalize terrorists and educate them on how to carry out attacks.

The issue is of particular concern after last week's attack on a London Underground train at Parsons Green, and follows a British thinktank report on Tuesday, which found that online jihadist propaganda attracts more clicks in Britain than anywhere else in Europe.

In particular, she wants them to "develop new technological solutions to prevent such content being uploaded in the first place".

The British government, along with the European Union and other political institutions, have repeatedly called upon internet companies to do more in the fight against terrorism.

A fresh target will then be set to cut the take-down time to an hour in a move towards a total block on terror content.

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Google and YouTube have said they are increasing their use of technology to help automatically identify videos.

"These companies have some of the best brains in the world", a Downing Street source told the BBC.

And Twitter has reportedly been removing hundreds of thousands of accounts this year that is said have been responsible for the "promotion of terrorism". "They should really be focusing on what matters, which is stopping the spread of terrorism and violence". Facebook has also said it is looking at developing artificial intelligence to automate the identification of terrorist material.

It was reported that once a person shows a bit of interest in such materials, algorithms used by search engines keep directing them to similar content and that it was this "echo chamber" that internet companies need to break. "We don't have all the answers, but we're committed to playing our part".

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