Singapore Airlines changed flight route after North Korea missile test

Different In another post Dr Langbroek highlighted that one image has Andromeda in the background and another has Orion

Different In another post Dr Langbroek highlighted that one image has Andromeda in the background and another has Orion

Korean Air pilots on two different planes also reported seeing flashes of light believed to be the North Korean missile when they were flying over Japan, airline spokesman Cho Hyun-mook said.

The crew of the Cathay Pacific Airways flight says they witnessed the rogue nation's latest weapon break apart and explode as it traveled through the sky early Wednesday morning on November 29.

Singapore Airlines has changed some of its flight routes between Asia and the U.S.in response to North Korea's missile tests, CNNMoney reported.

North Korea's new missile was reportedly a new type of nuclear-capable ICBM called the Hwasong-15.

The representative of the Ministry of defense Colonel Robert manning reported that the missile flew about 1,000 km before falling into the sea of Japan, reports Reuters.

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Korea's flag carrier Korean Air said that although it had not yet taken steps to change flight paths, it is carefully monitoring the situation, stressing that its current flight paths pose "absolutely no danger to passenger safety".

"At the moment, no one is changing any routes or operating parameters", the Hong Kong-based airline said in a statement.

While the UN's Civil Aviation Organization mandates that nations must issue warnings whenever they take an action that could threaten commercial flights traveling through their airspace, South Korea has said North Korea often neglects to do so, according to CNN. Air France also announced at the time that it had expanded its no-fly zone over North Korea, after one of its planes flew past the location where an ICBM splashed down 10 minutes later.

David C. Wright, a senior scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, wrote in a report Tuesday that the Cathay crew most likely had seen the missile's first stage burn out and fall back to earth.

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