Queen Elizabeth Says Wearing A Crown Has One Significant Downside

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Queen Elizabeth and how her crown could break her neck

"Fortunately, my father and I have about the same sort of shaped head", she said in a clip from the documentary. The documentary shows her peering inquisitively and then grinning as she taps at pearls hanging on the 1 kg (2.3 lb) crown, two of which are said to have been bought by her Tudor namesake Queen Elizabeth I.

The Queen has revealed that her preparation for her Coronation began at the age of 11, when her father asked her to write an account of his enthronement at Westminster Abbey in May 1937.

Not even that, though, was sufficient to prepare her for its weight on the day of the coronation: "There are some disadvantages to crowns, but otherwise they're quite important things", she said, elaborating that she learned on coronation day that "you can't look down to read the speech, you have to take the speech up".

"It's only sprung on leather, not very comfortable", she recalled of the carriage.

The Queen may enjoy the great privilege of wearing a crown, but the extravagant headpiece doesn't come without its downside. The documentary also features an interview with the Queen and it is expected to make more revelations such like this. But for, wearing the crown comes with far more practical concerns.

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"Not what they're meant to do", the Queen quipped.

"Because if you did [look down] your neck would break and [the crown] would fall off", the Queen said, smiling as she tilted her head downwards.

It was known that the crown jewels had been taken to Windsor Castle, but during the BBC programme it emerged they were kept in a hole dug under a secret exit from the castle.

Here is the Queen watching archive footage of the momentous day and revealing the sense of history, and humour, that has characterised her reign. The operation, meant to ensure the priceless gems did not fall into Nazi hands, was ordered by Queen Elizabeth II's father, King George VI. Anxious that the weight of the elaborate jewels at the centrepiece of her crown would injure her neck, she quips: "So there are some disadvantages to crowns, but otherwise they're quite important things".

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