It's so cold in Russian Federation that thermometers are breaking

NATION-NOW     So you think you're cold? How does 88 below zero sound?     
       So you think you're cold? How does 88 below zero sound

NATION-NOW So you think you're cold? How does 88 below zero sound? So you think you're cold? How does 88 below zero sound

'It broke because it was too cold, ' reported The Siberian Times.

If you think it's been cold in the United Kingdom recently, spare a thought for the people of the village of Oymyakon in Russian Federation.

Temperatures fell to -67C, breaking thermometers at Oymyakon, in world's coldest inhabited region in Russia's remote, diamond-rich Yakutia on Tuesday.

Residents there took the cold in stride as evidenced by social media images of cold-weather selfies and stories about stunts in the extreme temperatures, the Associated Press said.

In Yakutia - a region of one million people about 5300km east of Moscow - students routinely go to school even in -40C. It was over the weekend when reports came out that two men had frozen to death as they made efforts to move past a nearby bush and that was after the auto they had been travelling in broke down.

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The adverse weather conditions were not as easy to brush off by authorities, however, who announced Monday that they are now operating on high alert, vigilant of the increased risk of cold-related emergencies.

The last time temperatures were this cold in the village was in February 1993, when Oymyakon officially hit minus 67.7C, the Siberian Times highlights. The coldest all-time temperature was below -90, recorded in the Antarctic by NASA using satellite data.

Another Yakutsk resident Vladimir Danilovs posted video from an outdoor fish market in the city as temperature dipped to minus 49 degrees Celsius.

Oymyakon, in Russia's Yakutia region, has long carried the reputation of recording the lowest temperature of any permanent settlement in the world, claiming the mercury dropped to -68 Celsius 1933 (-90 Fahrenheit).

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