Southwest Pilots: 'Our Hearts Are Heavy'

The Southwest Airlines Incident Poses An Interesting Question Should Passengers Film During An Emergency

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U.S. aviation authorities are to order inspections of jet engines after a mid-air explosion that punctured an airliner's window, killing a passenger.

The directive will require ultrasonic inspections of fan blades when they reach a certain number of takeoffs and landings.

The two pilots of a Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing in Philadelphia after their engine blew apart, leading to the death of a woman, say their "hearts are heavy".

The "pop" he heard was likely the window shattering in Row 14 after an engine malfunction shot pieces of metal shrapnel into the plane. It reads, in part, "We all feel we were simply doing our jobs".

Shults and the first officer in a joint statement declined media interviews.

Fan blades that have undergone a certain number of flights will be given ultrasonic tests, it said.

"It just becomes nearly robotic when you memorize it", said Matt Cochran, who worked as a flight attendant for a regional US airline in the '90s and who even years later said he clearly remembers the message's "nose and mouth" part. "I need to help my family right now".

The FAA has now ordered inspections of CFM56-7B engines, the type that failed on the Southwest flight and that is used in more than 6,700 airliners. Family, friends and community leaders are mourning the death of Riordan, a bank executive on a Southwest Airlines jet that blew an engine as she was flying home from a business trip to NY.

A National Transportation Safety Board inspection crew was also combing over the Boeing 737-700 for signs of what caused the engine to explode. The blade was separated at the point where it would come into the hub and there was evidence of metal fatigue.

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Aircraft cabins are pressurized to keep passengers comfortable and alive at high altitudes, said Jim Gregory, a professor of aeronautical engineering and director of the Aerospace Research Center at Ohio State University.

That proposed directive has not been finalized in the eight months since it was proposed, according to a report in the Seattle Times. "Any blades that fail the inspection will have to be replaced", FAA said in a statement released on the evening of April 18.

On Tuesday morning, pilot Tammie Jo Shults miraculously saved 148 lives by successfully completing an emergency landing at the Philadelphia International Airport.

"We did CPR on this lady", Phillips told ABC affiliate WFAA-TV on Tuesday, adding, "A window had broken, and the suction - the negative pressure - had pulled her outside the plane partially", Phillips told ABC affiliate WFAA-TV on Tuesday.

In this 2017 photo, Jennifer Riordan, of Albuquerque, N.M., poses for a photo in Albuquerque.

The plane from NY to Dallas landed in Philadelphia.

But the mantra can become rote, flight attendants told CNN, both for those who deliver it several times a day and for the passengers whose lives it's meant to protect. During the incident, he logged on to the in-flight Wi-Fi to send messages to his family. Southwest flight from NYC to Dallas!'

Many passengers seen in cellphone images from Tuesday's Southwest flight that suffered a blown engine were incorrectly wearing their oxygen masks.

The Southwest plane sped into Philadelphia International Airport at 190-miles-per hour.

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