End of Net Neutrality takes effect today

Net neutrality ends this Monday June 11th motion to keep it alive could die in the House

It's 4th and 40 for net neutrality supporters in Congress as House is short of the votes needed to bring up the CRA motion

Ellis SchumerDem leaders condemn Trump after reversal on G-7 communique endorsement Dem lawmaker: Trump conceding "role as leader of the free world" after G-7 summit Schumer: Trump "turning our foreign policy into an worldwide joke" MORE (D-N.Y) is blaming congressional Republicans for the repeal of the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) net neutrality rules, a shift which goes into effect Monday.

It was put in place by the Obama Administration but President Trump chose to scrap the rule in December.

Last month, FCC chairman Ajit Pai said the retraction of net neutrality rules was needed to remove needless and onerous regulations.

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"The gutting of net neutrality is a symbol of our broken democracy", Fight for the Future Deputy Director Evan Greer said in a statement. "But it has sparked an unprecedented backlash from across the political spectrum, and Internet users are coming out of the woodwork to fight tooth and nail in Congress, in the courts, and at the local and state level". His order, touted as promoting investment and broadband deployment, loosens the FCC's regulation of ISPs, and instead gives the Federal Trade Commission jurisdiction to enforce violations. In other words, net neutrality is dead, folks. This, according to Pai, "will allow consumers to make an informed decision about which Internet service provider is best for them". Some states are creating their own net neutrality rules, but are barred by the FCC from implementing them. Under the new guidelines, ISPs can block, throttle, or prioritize internet content as much as they like, as long as they clearly disclose to customers that that's what they're doing.

"At the dawn of the commercial Internet, President [Bill] Clinton and a Republican Congress agreed on a light-touch framework to regulating the Internet". "That idea sits at the foundation of internet services, reflects how consumers enjoy the internet today, and despite claims to the contrary, has never truly been in jeopardy". But in December, the FCC switched broadband back to a Title I classification, giving the FTC some of the regulatory authority the FCC previously had over ISPs and negating the legal authority the FCC had to ban practices like blocking, throttling and paid prioritization.

"We'll see what happens after the [midterm] election", Lewis says. "But then in 2015, the FCC chose a different course". Some states, like New Jersey, Washington, and California, have been actively working on state laws that would keep net neutrality alive within their jurisdictions. Additionally, 22 states' and Washington DC's attorneys general have filed a lawsuit alongside almost a dozen other groups, challenging the FCC decision.

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