'60 Minutes' executive producer Jeff Fager out at CBS

Jeff Fager

'60 Minutes' executive producer Jeff Fager out at CBS

Fager, who is a former CBS News chairman and was a "60 Minutes" executive producer for 15 seasons, has denied the allegations, which include dissuading employees from reporting incidents to HR.

Fager's departure comes amid a slew of sexual misconduct accusations that have been leveled against the longtime CBS News executive.

The New Yorker this summer reported allegations that Fager, who had been at CBS News for more than three decades, touched employees inappropriately and enabled a culture of bad behavior inside the organization.

The network news president, David Rhodes, said Fager's firing was "not directly related" to the allegations against him, but because he violated company policy.

Rhodes said Fager violated company policy but did not specify the policy.

It was shortly after outlets began to pick up the news of Fager's exit that he released a statement of his own, in light of CBS News' refusing to comment on his specific violation.

He said he didn't think one note would have resulted in a dismissal after 36 years at the network, "but it did".

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"There are people who lost their jobs trying to harm me and if you pass on these damaging claims without your own reporting to back them up that will become a serious problem", Fager wrote, according to Duncan.

In the texts, which were sent after Duncan went for comment, Hager wrote: 'If you repeat these false accusations without any of your own reporting to back them up, you will be held responsible for harming me'. The investigations into CBS and CBS News, one of which started after allegations against Charlie Rose surfaced and another after reports on Moonves, will continue.

"I am that reporter".

After the text was shared on air, others at CBS also said they interpreted it as a threat.

Farrow also cited "nineteen current and former employees" who said Fager "allowed harassment in the division". He was known as a hands-on executive producer, famous for meticulous involvement in screenings of prospective "60 Minutes" segments - in the tradition laid out by his predecessor.

"Despite Charlie's important journalistic contribution to our news division, there is absolutely nothing more important, in this or any organization, than ensuring a safe, professional workplace - a supportive environment where people feel they can do their best work", Rhodes said in a memo a year ago. "60 Minutes" is, as Rhodes notes in his memo, "the most significant news broadcast on television", having debuted in 1968 and served as the investigative home for such television inquisitors as Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Ed Bradley and Lesley Stahl.

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