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El Chapo New York

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NY jury reached a guilty verdict today in the El Chapo trial.

One of the major figures in Mexican drug wars that have roiled the country since 2006, Guzman was extradited to the United States for trial in 2017 after he was arrested in Mexico the year before.

During the 11-week trial jurors were shown shocking photos of crime scenes, drugs, military-grade weapons, and tunnels used by the drug lord during his decades-long career.

As the judge read the verdict, Guzman stared at the jury straight-faced.

A defense lawyer says Guzman's conviction is "devastating".

Over the course of two and a half months, a jury of eight women and four men in Brooklyn federal court heard testimony about unspeakable torture and ghastly murders, epic corruption at almost every level of Mexico's government, narco-mistresses and naked subterranean escapes, gold-plated AK-47s and monogrammed, diamond-encrusted pistols.

Guzman and his drug cartel reportedly made billions in profits by smuggling tons of cocaine, heroin, meth and marijuana into the U.S. It was an operation that dated back to the 1980s.

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After he was convicted, the drug lord waved at his wife, Emma Coronel Aispuro, a former beauty queen, CNN reported.

Jurors have reached a verdict in the case of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, the Mexican druglord accused of carrying out a sprawling criminal enterprise as chief of the Sinaloa cartel.

The jury of eight women and four men deliberated roughly 34 hours over 6 days. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador was elected previous year after promising a change, suggesting a negotiated peace and amnesty for non-violent drug dealers, traffickers, and farmers.

Through them, jurors heard how the Sinaloa Cartel gained power amid the shifting allegiances of the Mexican drug trade in the 1990s, eventually coming to control nearly the entire Pacific coast of Mexico.

The evidence included testimony from 14 cooperators.

In closing arguments, defense attorney Jeffrey Lichtman urged the jury not to believe government witnesses who "lie, steal, cheat, deal drugs and kill people".

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